I'm very pleased that 58% of Swiss voters said YES to the Energiestrategie 2050 yesterday! This does not mean, of course, that all the wind projects on the waiting list will suddenly be able to be built, but at least it shows that the country is ready to go in the right direction. Great news!

What does this mean for wind energy? Well, according to Suisse Eole, the 37 currently installed wind turbines with a capacity of 75 MW in Switzerland are expected to reach an average yearly production of 128 GWh of electricity. This is equivalent to an average of about 1,700 full load hours (full load hours = production in MWh / capacity in MW).

The goals of the Energiestrategie 2050 are to reach 600 GWh in 2020 and 4000 GWh in 2050. How many wind turbines have to be built to do this? Well, if we assume a slightly lower average full load hours than 1,700, just to be on the safe side - let's say 1,500 - we get the following (approximate) results:

2017 - 2020

  • Extra production in 2020 compared to 2016 = 600 GWh - 128 GWh = 472 GWh
  • Extra installed capacity = production in MWh / full load hours = 472,000 / 1,500 = 315 MW
  • Number of new 2 MW wind turbines = 315 / 2 = 160
  • Number of new 2 MW wind turbines per year (including 2017 and 2020) = 160 / 4 = 40

2020 - 2050

  • Extra production in 2050 compared to 2020 = 4,000 GWh - 600 GWh = 3,400 GWh
  • Extra installed capacity = production in MWh / full load hours = 3,400,000 / 1,500 = 2,267 MW
  • Number of new 2 MW wind turbines = 2,267 / 2 = 1'133
  • Number of new 2 MW wind turbines per year= 1'133 / 30 = 40

So, 40 new 2 MW wind turbines need to be installed every year, giving a total of 1,300 new wind turbines by 2050! If, how and where they are going to be built shall be future topics in my blog!

 

 I just love this photo of the wind turbines at Griespass from ©Olivier Weiss / Swisswinds (from  here  on 22.05.2017)

I just love this photo of the wind turbines at Griespass from ©Olivier Weiss / Swisswinds (from here on 22.05.2017)

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